Category Archives: Football

Is Coaching Your Own Child a Good Idea?


Coaching Sports to Your Children

Posted by Jodi Murphy
Some sports parents would jump at the chance to coach their own youth athletes. After all, they spend plenty of time playing catch or tossing balls for batting practice in the backyard and are at every game already, how much harder is it to be the actual coach? But before you dive headfirst into the world of parent-coaches here are four questions you should ask yourself.

Are you sure you won’t be biased?

A lot of parents decide to become parent-coaches because it’s a great way to spend more time with their youth athlete. Any sports parent can tell you that athletics takes up a huge chunk of their child’s free time so if you can’t beat ‘em, coach ‘em! But it’s important to remember that you aren’t just coaching your own child—you’ve got a dozen other kids to look out for as well. You need to make sure that every player is getting the attention they need to learn the fundamental skills of the sport and succeed as individuals and as a team. Just because you’re the coach that doesn’t automatically mean your child is the center of the team!

Is Coaching Your Own Child a Good Idea?

It’s also important to make sure that you don’t let your own player get away with behavior that their teammates would get called out for. If missing a practice means losing playing time that rule has to apply to everyone—including the coach’s kid.

Will you expect perfection?

On the other side of things—in an attempt to make sure they aren’t unduly favoring their own child, some parent-coaches put extra pressure on their own youth athlete to excel and be perfect on the field/court. While it’s important you don’t let your own player get preferential treatment, it’s easy to swing too far in the other direction as well. Some players might thrive as the “coach’s kid” because they want to be a leader on their team but others might feel like you are unfairly singling them out or expecting more from them than their teammates. Just because you’re the coach that doesn’t automatically mean you child is going to be a superstar athlete and it isn’t fair to expect them to turn into one overnight just because you decided to take over as coach.

Sports Coaching Your Kids

Can you “turn off” your coach mentality?

As a parent-coach it’s important to remember that you are equal parts parent and coach. When you go home after a disappointing game are you going to strategize like a coach and run a play-by-play of everything that went wrong or are you going to put your parent hat back on and let it go? Think about some of the crazy coaches you had in your own sports career—would you have wanted to live with them?! A good parent-coach needs to be able to switch back and forth between the two roles as needed.

Do you actually know the rules of the game?

Most youth sports organizations are always on the hunt for volunteers and while enthusiasm can take you a long way a little knowledge can’t hurt either! Typically the best youth sports coaches are going to be the ones that understand the rules and fundamentals of the game so they can actually coach their team! Remember, you aren’t just coaching your own child—you’re responsible for the athletic development of a dozen or so other kids! It’s a big responsibility and an important factor to consider.

Becoming a parent-coach can change the dynamics between you and your youth athlete dramatically, so before you sign up to coach your daughter’s soccer team or your son’s lacrosse team it’s probably worth talking to them about it. Are they going to be comfortable with you as their coach? Your 5 year old probably won’t care but as your kids get older and they start to take sports more seriously their opinion should count for something.

Comments

As a full time soccer coach personally I would say no for one reason only.
Kids see the game differently to their coach. Accordingly, for what ever reason if ‘Little Jimmy‘ has a poor game but you decide to still select him for whatever reason for the next game then usually no problem.
However if the same scenario involves your own son then immediately the other playerds will view this simply as favoring ‘Teachers Pet‘ and it will be the lad who suffers.

Posted @ Friday, January 04, 2013 11:56 AM by dennis
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Filed under Baseball, Coach Reviews, Football, Kids Sports, Soccer, View All, Youth Sports

Football Team Stands Up Against Bullying: How do Your School Athletes Make a Difference?


Football Players Stand Up to Bullying

Football Players Stand Up to Bullying

Queen Creek High School football players stood up to bullies who were throwing trash at a freshman who has a rare brain disorder

via WATCH: Football team stands up against bullying | National News.

Way to go!  All football players should stop bullying then they become the heroes off the field too.

When I was in high school, the entire athletic department made an agreement to attend each other sports. Soon all the games were packed with fans not just football and basketball.  As the athletes/cool kids attracted others to attend the games.  With the fan support, all of our teams performed better. Leadership is contagious.

Athletes need to realize they are the influences and can have a super positive impact on the school and their fellow students.

Here’s to positive reviews on LocalSportsReviews.com (coming soon).  Check us out on LocalSportsReviews.wordpress.com for our blog.

WATCH: Football team stands up against bullying

Queen Creek High School football players stood up to bullies who were throwing trash at a freshman who has a rare brain disorder

( | Prep Rally) Chy Johnson is a freshman at Queen Creek (Ariz.) High who happens to have a brain disorder. She is the prototypical outsider new girl on campus, the easiest teen to pick on and the last to be able to stand up for herself. Right on cue, no sooner had Johnson enrolled at Queen Creek than she began being the victim of nasty bullying from a wide variety of fellow Queen Creek students, some of whom allegedly even threw trash at the 16 year old.

The bullying incidents got so bad that Johnson’s mother reached out to the one teen at the school with whom she had a social connection through a friend, a senior named Carson Jones. As it turns out, Jones is also the starting quarterback for the Queen Creek football team, a good looking one at that. In short, he is the apex of cool at Queen Creek.

As first reported by AZFamily.com, all Johnson’s mother wanted was to know the name of the girls who were bullying her daughter. Instead, Jones decided to take it upon himself to protect the freshman, eating lunch with her every day and ensuring that she was protected by a phalanx of other football players when she walked through the hall.

“They’re not mean to me, because all my boys love me,” Chy told AZFamily. “So much.”

Chy’s “boys” form a solid core of the Queen Creek football team, and they have successfully kept those who would target the special needs student away. Jones doesn’t completely understand why or how it has happened, but it has.

“They’re not bullying her anymore because they’ve seen her with us or something,” Jones told AZFamily.

For their part, Jones and his teammates say that they’re getting just as much out of the relationship as Johnson is, too.

“It feels good to know that we helped someone else, because you know, we’re doing good, everything for us is going well, but someone else needs to feel good, too,” Queen Creek senior Tucker Workman told AZFamily.

Read more: http://www.kfiam640.com/cc-common/news/sections/newsarticle.html?feed=104668&article=10559771#ixzz2BfsrrlkU

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Coach Jerry Sandusky gets 30 to 60 years for child sex abuse; Let’s Start to Publicaly Review Our Coaches


Coach Finally Gets Sentenced for Abuse

Sundusky Gets 30 to 60 Years in Prison for Abuse

Former Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky, who was convicted of 45 counts of child sex abuse, was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison. NBC’s John Yang reports.

By M. Alex Johnson and Kimberly Kaplan, NBC News

New in this version: Comments from judge, Sandusky, victims, attorneys and Penn State

Updated at 11:17 a.m. ET: BELLEFONTE, Pa. — Former Penn State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison Tuesday for abusing 10 boys he met over 15 years through his charity for troubled children.

Sandusky — who was defensive coordinator and for many years the presumed heir-apparent to legendary Penn State football coach Joe Paterno — could have faced as long as 400 years for his convictions on 45 counts of child sexual abuse.

But McKean County Common Pleas Court Judge John Cleland, who was brought in to hear the trial after all of Centre County‘s judges recused themselves, told Sandusky that at age 68, he would be in prison “for the rest of your life.”

“The crime is not only what you did to their bodies but to their psyches and their souls and the assault to the well-being of the larger community in which we all live,” Cleland said.

Sandusky’s lead attorney, Joe Amendola, told reporters outside court that he would file an appeal within 10 days, saying he hadn’t had enough time to prepare an adequate defense.

Four of Sandusky’s victims and the mother of a fifth addressed the court, some of them speaking tearfully to Sandusky. They told of how they had looked up at Sandusky as a mentor, only to have him betray their trust.

“You were the person in my life who was supposed to be a role model, teach honor, respect and accountability, and instead you did terrible things that screwed up my life,” said one of the victims, whom NBC News isn’t identifying.

“You had the chance to plead guilty and spare us the testimony,” he said. “Rather than take the accountability, you decided to try to attack us as if we had done something wrong.”

Another said: “I have tried to think of the words to describe how Jerry Sandusky has impacted my life. There are no words adequate to express the pain and misery he has inflicted in the past, present and future.

“He promised to be my friend and mentor. Then came the ultimate betrayal and deeds. He humiliated me beyond description.”

For his part, Sandusky — as he did in a surprise audio statement Monday night on the Penn State student radio station — insisted that “I didn’t do these alleged disgusting acts.”

Saying he had been advised against speaking at length, Sandusky told Cleland that “as I began to relive everything, I remember my feelings. So many people were hurt, and my eyes filled with tears. It was a horrible time in life to witness, to listen to, be a part of.”

Sandusky said he had “hope in my heart for a brighter day, not knowing when that day will come.”

“Many moments I have spent looking for a purpose,” he said. “Maybe it will help others — some vulnerable children who may have been abused may not be as a result of all the publicity — but I’m not sure about it. I would hope that it would happen.

“I would cherish the opportunity to be a little candle for others as my life goes on as they have been a huge light to me.”

After the hearing, Senior Deputy Attorney General Joseph McGettigan, who prosecuted the case for the state, called Sandusky’s comments “banal self-delusion completely untethered from reality.”

“It was, in short, ridiculous,” he said.

Sandusky alleges massive conspiracy
Wearing a red prison jumpsuit and appearing notably thinner than before he was convicted in June, Sandusky was transported to Centre County Court from jail in a sheriff’s patrol car shortly before the hearing. His wife, Dottie, was in attendance.

Jerry Sandusky spoke out from jail on the eve of his sentencing. NBC’s Michael Isikoff reports.

Sandusky’s statement echoed many of the ideas — some of them word for word — that he broached in his surprise statement Monday night, in which he blamed a widespread conspiracy among police, university administrators and the media for his conviction.

After the hearing, Amendola alluded to that theory, alleging that there was “an undercurrent” in some parts of state government to bring down Penn State because of the power Paterno had amassed in 46 years as head football coach.

“Folks, my understanding is for years opponents had ongoing battles with the state Legislature over funding,” Amendola said. “Penn State always held itself over and above” other state institutions, which rankled some officials, he said.

But in sentencing Sandusky on Tuesday, Cleland called that theory “unbelievable.”

Related: Full statement from Jerry Sandusky

Related: Audio of Sandusky’s statement on Penn State student station ComRadio

In a statement, Penn State President Rodney Erickson said: “Our thoughts today, as they have been for the last year, go out to the victims of Jerry Sandusky’s abuse. While today’s sentence cannot erase what has happened, hopefully it will provide comfort to those affected by these horrible events and help them continue down the road to recovery.”

The statement reflected how deeply the scandal rocked Penn State and Centre County.

Paterno, who was a revered figure representing integrity in college football, was fired Nov. 9 amid allegations that he didn’t properly report concerns about Sandusky to authorities. He died in January at age 85.

University President Graham Spanier resigned in November. Athletic Director Tim Curley is on administrative leave, and Senior Vice President Gary Schultz retired. Curley and Schultz face separate trials on charges that they lied to a grand jury about what they knew.

Watch US News videos on NBCNews.com

Penn State’s storied football program, meanwhile, was fined $60 million by the NCAA and was stripped of all victories back to 1998.

Jerry Sandusky gets 30 to 60 years for child sex abuse.

Let’s start to review our coaches and sports online so the coaches that make a positive impact get the credit and the ones that abuse the systems are discovered quickly.  That is why we are building LocalSportsReviews.com (coming soon).

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Just like the NFL, Pop Warner Football Coach Pays Cash for Big Hits and Knocking Opponents (10 and 11 year olds players) Out of Games


Just like NFL, Pop Warner Football Coach Pays Cash for Big Hits and Knocking Opponents Out of Games80820000gph1aebvt.1.jpg

Seven Pop Warner Players Have Now Come Forward That They Got Paid for Football Hits

Football Head to Head Hit That Injured a Pop Warner Player
Football Head to Head Hit That Injured a Pop Warner Player

By KEITH SHARON and FRANK MICKADEIT / THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

640AM Keith Sharon interview http://www.kfiam640.com/player/?station=KFI-AM&program_name=podcast&program_id=JohnandKen.xml&mid=22474893 – Sharon describes how he uncovered the story.  Seven families come forward.

Four months before the world heard about the New Orleans Saints‘ bounty scandal, two Pop Warner football coaches in Tustin began offering cash to their 10- and 11-year-old players for making big hits and knocking opponents out of games, according to an assistant coach, a parent, interviews with players and signed statements by two players.

Tustin Red Cobras head coach Darren Crawford and assistant coach Richard Bowman, whose powerhouse squad went undefeated during the 2011 regular season, told their team to target specific players on the youth football teams from Yorba Linda, Santa Margarita and San Bernardino, said then-assistant coach John Zanelli and three players interviewed by the Register.

This Santa Margarita boy, whose parents asked not to use his name, played for the Pop Warner Stallions last year and was targeted by the Tustin Red Cobras.

All the other coaches and Tustin Pop Warner league officials deny a bounty program took place. Crawford said they did target opposing players but never told their team to injure them and never offered any payment for hitting or injuring them.

One of the targeted players, an 11-year-old running back from the Santa Margarita Stallions, suffered a concussion after he was hit by a Red Cobras player in the Pop Warner Orange Bowl last November. The player who delivered the hit was paid by Crawford after the game, Zanelli said.

The Register is not naming any of the players because of their ages.

Tustin league president Pat Galentine, who was an assistant coach for the 2011 Red Cobras, emphatically denied any mention of money by Crawford or Bowman.

“At no time was a bounty program ever discussed or was there an exchange of money for anything,” Galentine said.

However, the parent of one of the Red Cobras players said money was paid to his son after the playoff game against Yorba Linda.

“My son said he had won the prize,” said the father, whose name is not being used to protect the identity of his son. “He had a good, clean hit. The kids voted his play as the play of the game. He showed me one $20 bill. He said the coaches, plural, gave it to him.”

That parent said he had told Galentine about his son receiving money in a phone call Friday morning. But when reached by The Register, Galentine said he was having difficulty with his phone and didn’t hear what the parent said.

Reached by phone this week, Crawford and Bowman denied the existence of a bounty program. Crawford, still a football coach in the Tustin Pop Warner program, said the parents who made the allegations are “disgruntled” and that they forced their children to lie. Bowman, who is taking a year off from coaching, said the parents and players are lying.

“It’s amazing what disgruntled parents will put their kids through,” Crawford said.

Late Friday, Crawford said he is having trouble remembering whether he gave any player money after the Yorba Linda game. He said, “Maybe I did give him money to go to the snack bar.” But he was sure he didn’t give any money as a part of a bounty program.

Crawford said he knows for sure he did not give any player money after the Santa Margarita or San Bernardino games.

Officials from the Orange Empire Conference, which oversees Pop Warner football in this region, investigated the allegations, interviewing coaches, parents and players from the Red Cobras and decided not to hand out any punishments or sanctions.

O.E.C. commissioner Robert T. “Bobby” Espinosa said he found “no evidence” of a bounty program after hearing and reading statements from six parents and four players that alleged Crawford and Bowman offered between $20 and $50 during three playoff games at the end of the 2011 Junior Pee Wee football season.

Two players who allegedly took money from the coaches did not agree to be interviewed by the O.E.C. The father of one of those players, the same father who told The Register his son had been paid, was among the parents interviewed by Espinosa. Zanelli said he was in the room when that father told Espinosa his son had been paid.

Coaches Allegedly Paid Pop Warner Football Players for Big Hits

Coaches Allegedly Paid Pop Warner Football Players for Big Hits

Some parents of the targeted players are outraged.

Tara Yocam, the mother of a targeted Santa Margarita player, said, “The (Tustin) coaches’ behavior is appalling. I wouldn’t allow my son to play for those Neanderthals. They’re low-lifes. I’m embarrassed for them. It’s immature parenting, trying to win at all cost. Where is the sense of right and wrong? It shows a complete lack of integrity.”

Bitterness, accusations and bad blood are not uncommon in Pop Warner football, or other youth sports. In Tustin, both Bowman and Zanelli (who are on opposite sides of the bounty allegations) acknowledge each of them was suspended by their league for confrontations they’ve had with other parents.

Allegations that coaches paid children to knock others out of the game make this case unique.

An official at Pop Warner’s national office in Pennsylvania said he was made aware of the Tustin allegations, but because the incidents occurred at Southern California games, it was the O.E.C.,’s responsibility to conduct a hearing and hand out punishment if necessary.

Josh Pruce, Pop Warner’s national director of scholastics and media relations, said he can’t remember a bounty scandal ever happening in their program.

“There shouldn’t be that issue in Pop Warner football,” Pruce said. “There is no place for it. The kids are out there to learn football. There is no place for a bounty system.”

Zanelli, three players and two parents met with The Register last Sunday and offered detailed descriptions of the Red Cobras’ bounty program.

They said Crawford was stung by his team’s loss to Saddleback Valley in the 2010 Pop Warner Orange Bowl, and was determined to win the Pop Warner Orange Bowl in the 2011 season, advance through the playoffs and win the Pop Warner Super Bowl in Florida.

Zanelli and two of the players said the first mention of money came during a team huddle near the end of football practice on Monday, Oct. 24, 2011.

When Crawford first mentioned he would pay money for big hits and knocking opponents out of games, many of the Tustin Red Cobras shouted excitedly, energized by the prospect of earning cash, the players said.

“We were like, ‘OK! We’re going to go hit them! Wow!'” one player said. A second player said, “When we were after practice, getting our gear off, we were guessing who was going to get the money.”

That week the Red Cobras were preparing for their second playoff game of 2011. They would be facing a good team from Yorba Linda. During that week’s practice, Crawford told the players to target particular players on the Yorba Linda team.

“Crawford was saying, basically, they were going to give kids cash for the biggest hits in the game, and Bowman said if they hit certain players, they would get more money,” Zanelli said. “One was No. 42, and there were a couple of others as well.”

“As the practices went on that week, Bowman in particular would reiterate (the bounty program) to the kids time and again,” Zanelli said.

During an Oct. 27 film session at Crawford’s house, Crawford explained how the winners of the cash would be determined, three players said. Crawford told the team that they could all vote, and the player with the most votes would get money. Crawford told them the most money could be won if the opponents’ best player had to leave the game, they said.

Galentine, who said he attended every film session, said the coaches made no mention of money or bounties.

On game day, Oct. 29, the Red Cobras were going through their pre-game tackling drills. If a player executed a good warm-up hit, Bowman would yell, “‘That will get you money,'” a player said.

After the game, which the Red Cobras won 28-6, Zanelli and the players said Crawford gathered the team on the sideline and asked for a show of hands to vote for the best and second-best hits of the game.

Then Crawford asked the assistant coaches to pitch in to pay the players who won. Zanelli said he and another assistant coach did not contribute to the bounty fund.

“It wasn’t right,” Zanelli said.

Zanelli and one of the players said they saw Crawford, who was standing near the Tustin sideline after the conclusion of the Yorba Linda game, give cash to the player who got the most votes.

The players said they were caught up in the competitive spirit and didn’t consider whether it was right or wrong to accept money for great hits or even hurting an opposing player. One player said: “I was so excited, I didn’t think that much about it.”

The next week, before the playoff game against Santa Margarita, the Tustin coaches targeted at least three opposing players, Zanelli and the players said. At the Oct. 31 practice, the numbers of the Santa Margarita targets were taped to a Tustin tackling sled.

“It was a matter of knocking them out of the game,” one of the players said. “Now that I look back, I know it was wrong.”

The players said there was now so much talk among the Red Cobras about the money that Crawford told them, “Don’t go bragging about this to anybody.”

On Nov. 4, the Red Cobras played Santa Margarita in the Pop Warner Orange Bowl at Laguna Hills High School. The winner would be one victory away from qualifying to go to Florida.

In the days leading up to the game, Zanelli said he told Crawford he didn’t think the bounty program was a good idea. He said Crawford told him, “I hear you. I’ll talk to Rich (Bowman).” After that, Zanelli said, Bowman was more subdued during practice drills.

Still, Zanelli and the players said, several Santa Margarita players were targeted, including the quarterback and the running backs. And on game day, during pre-game warm-ups, Bowman tried to get the players fired up by yelling, “Do you want that money?”

Tustin had a 32-6 lead in the fourth quarter, but some of its best players were still in the game. On an off-tackle play, a Santa Margarita running back and a Tustin defender collided. It was so violent, Zanelli recalled, “There was a gasp from the crowd.”

A videotape of the game shows a helmet-to-helmet collision and the 11-year-old Santa Margarita player goes down. The stadium announcer says, “A big hit” with emphasis on big. The Santa Margarita player is seen lying on the ground. The Tustin player who made the hit tries to help him up, but the Santa Margarita player wobbles and falls again.

According to witnesses and participants, a doctor ran onto the field along with Santa Margarita coaches, and the game was delayed several minutes until the player was helped off the field.

Reggie Scales, the father of the injured player, was one of the coaches who went on the field to help. Scales said the doctor diagnosed his son with a mild concussion, and the boy did not return to the game. Scales said his son had headaches for more than a month after the hit.

“This kid speared him. Hit him right in the head,” Scales said. “It was a helmet-to-helmet hit.”

After the game, the Tustin players didn’t vote for the best hit. As coaches and kids walked to the post game awards ceremony, Zanelli said he saw Crawford give money directly to the player who made the game’s big hit. Another player said he was told by Crawford that he also would be receiving money for a big hit, but the coach never gave him the money.

Tustin now had to beat a San Bernardino team in the Wescon Regional Finals to determine the Junior Pee Wee champion for the western United States and the right to go to Florida. The bounty program became “more subdued, covert,” in the week leading up to that game, Zanelli said.

Zanelli and some players said that the talk of money was only between Crawford, Bowman and a few of the star players on the team. “They started concealing the program,” Zanelli said.

On Nov. 11, Tustin beat San Bernardino 34-0. Zanelli and the players interviewed said they didn’t know whether money was handed out after that game, but Zanelli said Crawford told the coaches there would be no such program in Florida.

On Dec. 4, the Tustin Red Cobras beat the Worchester (Mass.) Vikings 40-6. Then, in the semifinal game on Dec. 7, the Red Cobras were beaten by the Beacon House (Washington, D.C.) Falcons 12-8. Tustin’s season was over.

In the aftermath, Zanelli and six other parents from the Tustin team left Pop Warner and, with parents of 15 other boys, formed a team that now plays in a rival league. But not without a fight. The Tustin board wouldn’t allow Zanelli’s new team to play under the Tustin umbrella.

Jeff Wright, a Tustin board member, said he believes Zanelli, parents and players made up the story of the bounty program to use as leverage in an effort to force the league to allow them to form their own team.

Zanelli also took to the league allegations about the coaches falsifying the weights of the players (players were required to weigh just under 100 pounds at the end of the season) and the coaches fighting during their trip to Florida.

The league investigated and agreed with some of Zanelli’s allegations and suspended Bowman for half a season and put Crawford on probation.

For almost six months of haggling between the league and Zanelli, “He never mentioned the bounty,” Wright said.

Zanelli acknowledged that initially he kept quiet about the bounties. He said he felt bad that he, as an assistant coach, hadn’t done more to stop it. And he had another motivation for staying silent for as long as he did.

“I was concerned the bounty would bring down the entire Tustin organization,” Zanelli said.

Another reason for local sports reviews….

Pop Warner ‘bounties’ split Tustin club | players, zanelli, crawford – Life – The Orange County Register.

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